Alias

alias is a command in various command line interpreters (shells) such as Unix shells, 4DOS/4NT and Windows PowerShell, which enables a replacement of a word by another string. It is mainly used for abbreviating a system command, or for adding default arguments to a regularly used command. Aliasing functionality in the MS-DOS and Microsoft Windows operating systems is provided by the DOSKey command-line utility.

An alias will last for the life of the shell session. Regularly used aliases can be set from the shell’s configuration file (~/.cshrc or the systemwide /etc/csh.cshrc for csh, or ~/.bashrc or the systemwide /etc/bashrc or /etc/bash.bashrc for bash) so that they will be available upon the start of the corresponding shell session. The alias commands may either be written in the config file directly or sourced from a separate file, typically named .alias (or .alias-bash, .alias-csh, etc., if multiple shells may be used).

e.g.

alias

alias2alias3

You can view currently defined aliases eg.

alias4

more information alias

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